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We offer mold remediation Phoenix AZ services in the mainland and surrounding neighborhoods. Over the years, we have built a positive reputation in the greater Phoenix area among our clients. We strive to provide high-quality and honest workmanship.

Our reputation is the base of our business, and we work hard every day to maintain it through bettering ourselves as a company and servicing our clients.

+1 602 783 8876

Being an esteemed Phoenix mold removal company, we offer a wide range of services, such as mold removal, mold remediation, mold testing, mold inspection, and many more. If you want to learn more about our mold remediation Phoenix Arizona or any other service, give us a call. 

You can also request quotes for your home improvement tasks. One of our specialists will be happy to assist you. So, if you have any mold removal Phoenix needs, contact us through call.

About Phoenix

City of Phoenix, Arizona

Phoenix  is the capital and most populous city in Arizona, with 1,608,139 residents as of 2020. It is also the fifth-most populous city in the United States, the largest state capital by population, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents. Phoenix is the anchor of the Phoenix metropolitan area, also known as the Valley of the Sun, which in turn is part of the Salt River Valley. The metropolitan area is the 11th largest by population in the United States, with approximately 4.85 million people as of 2020.  Phoenix is the seat of Maricopa County and the largest city in the state at 517.9 square miles (1,341 km2), more than twice the size of Tucson and one of the largest cities in the United States. Phoenix was settled in 1867 as an agricultural community near the confluence of the Salt and Gila Rivers and was incorporated as a city in 1881. It became the capital of Arizona Territory in 1889.  It is in the northeastern reaches of the Sonoran Desert and has a hot desert climate. Despite this, its canal system led to a thriving farming community with the original settlers’ crops remaining important parts of the Phoenix economy for decades, such as alfalfacottoncitrus, and hay. Cotton, cattle, citrus, climate, and copper were known locally as the “Five C’s” anchoring Phoenix’s economy. These remained the driving forces of the city until after World War II, when high-tech companies began to move into the valley and air conditioning made Phoenix’s hot summers more bearable. The city averaged a four percent annual population growth rate over a 40-year period from the mid-1960s to the mid-2000s. This growth rate slowed during the Great Recession of 2007–09, and has rebounded slowly. Phoenix is the cultural center of the state of Arizona. The Hohokam people occupied the Phoenix area for 2,000 years. They created roughly 135 miles (217 kilometers) of irrigation canals, making the desert land arable, and paths of these canals were used for the Arizona CanalCentral Arizona Project Canal, and the Hayden-Rhodes Aqueduct. They also carried out extensive trade with the nearby Ancient PuebloansMogollon, and Sinagua as well as with the more distant Mesoamerican civilizations. It is believed periods of drought and severe floods between 1300 and 1450 led to the Hohokam civilization’s abandonment of the area. After the departure of the Hohokam, groups of Akimel O’odham (commonly known as Pima), Tohono O’odham, and Maricopa tribes began to use the area, as well as segments of the Yavapai and Apache. The O’odham were offshoots of the Sobaipuri tribe, who in turn were thought to be the descendants of the Hohokam. The Akimel O’odham were the major group in the area. They lived in small villages with well-defined irrigation systems that spread over the Gila River Valley, from Florence in the east to the Estrellas in the west. Their crops included corn, beans, and squash for food as well as cotton and tobacco. They banded with the Maricopa for protection against incursions by the Yuma and Apache tribes. The Maricopa are part of the larger Yuma people; however, they migrated east from the lower Colorado and Gila Rivers in the early 1800s, when they began to be enemies with other Yuma tribes, settling among the existing communities of the Akimel O’odham. The Tohono O’odham also lived in the region, but largely to the south and all the way to the Mexican border. The O’odham lived in small settlements as seasonal farmers who took advantage of the rains, rather than the large-scale irrigation of the Akimel. They grew crops such as sweet corn, tapery beans, squash, lentils, sugar cane, and melons, as well as taking advantage of native plants such as saguaro fruits, cholla buds, mesquite tree beans, and mesquite candy (sap from the mesquite tree). They also hunted local game such as deer, rabbit, and javelina for meat.

  • Area: 1,338 km²
  • Local Time: 
  • Weather: 12°C, Wind E at 10 km/h, 42% Humidity
  • Population: 1.633 million (2019)

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